Onion


Onion
According to the esteemed New Yorker, it's "the funniest publication in the United States." Reading The Onion, online or in print (it's distributed for free in select cities) has become a weekly ritual for more than three million people nationwide. If too much reading gives you headaches, you can always turn to their radio news, watch their 24-hour video news network, or flip through their hilarious "News in Photos." There's even an online Onion store, in case you're ever in need of a "Sounds of the Rainforest" smoke alarm or a "Visor-ganizer" that will help you carry up to 7 pounds of stuff, right on top of your baseball cap.

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With highly unbelievable coverage in local, national and world news, sports, science, entertainment and business, even a "War for the White House" section covering the 2008 U.S. election, the Onion prides itself on painting "a unique picture of the world." In most cases, the attention-grabbing, not-so-politically correct headlines alone are enough to get a chuckle out of its readership.

Onion From December 2007: "Man Finally Put in Charge of Struggling Feminist Movement." March 2004: "Study: 58 Percent of U.S. Exercise Televised." Back in January 1999, the Onion reported that "Laughter [is] Now Exclusively Used to Mask Feelings," and more recently, in April 2008, an article entitled "United Nations Pledges $1.2 Billion in Indigestion Relief for U.S." goes on to describe "the largest gastrointestinal rescue effort in history."

OnionFor the 2007 holiday season, the Onion's witty employees and chief ad account representatives were thanked with a gift from "America's Finest News Source." Nearly 700 Moleskine diaries, planners and pocket notebooks of various sizes and colors were blind debossed with the Onion logo and graphic. Diaries were wrapped in a custom four-color paper band, offering "Season's Greetings" and inviting recipients to jot down their "terrible hackneyed ideas."

Onion