Moma Atlantic Pacific


momapacific490.jpgOn a mission to inspire, The Museum of Modern Art encourages a more in-depth understanding and enjoyment of the art of our time. Like New York itself, MoMA attracts a diverse international audience - this is already clear when visitors step foot in the museum's lobby, where one can overhear all kinds of languages being spoken - but in early 2009, MoMA switched gears from global back to local.

From February 10 to March 15, MoMA stayed open 24/7 in Brooklyn's Atlantic Avenue/Pacific Street subway station. Reproductions of 58 works of art from the MoMA collection filled the station, inviting the public to "take a breath and take a look" at images of classic works by Pablo Picasso, Vincent van Gogh, Charles Eames, Man Ray, Georgia O'Keeffe, Cindy Sherman, Andy Warhol, and other renowned artists, filmmakers and designers. True to the MoMA's mission to educate, signs posted at payphones on the subway platforms incited passersby to dial the MoMA factline to hear audio commentary about the works. The subway installation was designed by thehappycorp global, and conceived with the aim to rouse commuters from their habitual trance and to introduce change into their daily routine, if only for a moment.

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Serving ten different subway lines, the Atlantic Avenue/Pacific Street station is uniquely suited to guarantee a broad audience, and MoMA Atlantic/Pacific tendered a clever reminder that the real museum, and the real Picassos and Pollocks, are only a short ride away. Online, the project website was regularly updated with photos of the installation sent in by the public via Flickr. The installation was celebrated with a proper exhibition opening for press and friends. A custom Moleskine pocket notebook was created for the occasion, with a custom paperband in keeping with the theme of movement and transportation, reading "Welcome" and "Thank You" over the arrow graphics borrowed from the MoMA Atlantic/Pacific logo. General information about the installation and about MoMA was silkscreened inside the front cover.